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Diesel Dan

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 26th 2018, 7:19 pm




Couple before pics
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TheQuig

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 26th 2018, 8:25 pm

Nice. Even though it is harder to work with, keep the concrete at a 4" slump. Adding water to the mix will weaken the design strength. After it is hard (end of the day) keep it wet as long as you can to slow the cure. It will gain strength above the design 3500lb. if you can keep it wet. I actually had to go to concrete school when I managed a concrete plant.


Concrete truck in Vancouver, Canada.


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Diesel Dan

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 26th 2018, 8:37 pm

Around here they are mostly front unloaders, 6X6.

Edit: I also ordered some Ghostshield 8505 sub-surface sealer for my oil drippers.
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TheQuig

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 27th 2018, 9:33 am

Same here, although there are still plenty of rear discharge. I drove both types, each has its advantages.

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Diseasel



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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 27th 2018, 11:11 am

Diesel Dan wrote:



Couple before pics

Those are good size sections. Does rebar allow you poor larger sections with less concern for cracking?
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TheQuig

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 27th 2018, 12:48 pm

Unless you have put in expansion joints, it will still crack, but the rebar will stop the crack from getting much larger. The rebar will allow the concrete from cracking under a heavy load. The concrete will expand and contract throughout the year with the change of temp. Some areas put expansion joint in while some like to saw cut the concrete a few days after the pour to control where it will crack. Rule of thumb is every 10' put in expansion or a cut.

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Diesel Dan

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 28th 2018, 10:39 am

Two expansion joints were put in at 12' spacing.

The pour went less than ideal.

First I was watching the weather, mist/drizzle, and thinking about pushing the truck back an hour or two. Walking in the house and wife mentions the batch plant called and wanted to know if I was ready and she had said yes, alrighty then....guess we are on.

Truck shows up and first few shovel fulls of concrete looks good...…..then it goes sideways.
The mix turns into the consistency of pea soup.   It's so thin it runs down hill, no way we can profile it. Driver tried to tighten the mix up by spinning the drum, not spinning the drum but didn't work. My neighbor points out, "tell them to bring a different truck".


Driver calls the plant, says they'll bring another load BUT same truck since they don't have any extra on hand so he'll have to dump this load, clean truck and then reload. Over an hour later another truck shows up, different driver with a good mix. It took so long I was concerned they weren't coming back that day and I was getting ready to pull the rebar and scoop out the remaining concrete before it hardens.

After an hour the wet mix had finally setup to a consistency it should have been when first poured! We spread it out thin enough that the new concrete could encase the rebar and the thin stuff used as a sub-base. The guys on the screed board did really good, edging good too even though we started a little too soon. My bull floating needs some practice and better timing. All and all it wasn't too bad for having no lead foreman with finishing experience.

However this is why I'm practicing on the apron. If there are any lows I have enough slope the water will sit. Rough surface is desirable for outdoor finish. As my helpers said, if it holds a car, it passes. Smile You can see the extra concrete in the upper left being used as fill, I paid for it so might as well use it.
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TheQuig

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 28th 2018, 4:43 pm

You should be fine. That's why I was saying to make sure no more than a 4" slump. Spinning the barrel can sometimes tighten the load, but most times no. The ticket you got with the load should say strength based on a 4" slump and adding water will not guarantee the strength. I must have left out the 4" slump part the second time I posted. The first one deleted after I wrote it (has happened a lot when I post here) It will crack, you are just telling it where to crack. I have what's called a jitter bug. After the screed, the jitter bug will pack down the stones around an inch on the top surface. This way when you bull float it you are not pulling any stone up. Some people don't agree with the method. Then I have a steel trowel that fits on the bull float handles and I will steel trowel it before either hand troweling it, or giving it a broom finish. Then one last time with the edger. Concrete is hard work and the trick is knowing when to start the finish. This time of year, and the weather are in your advantage. Keep it wet with the garden hose.

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Last edited by TheQuig on October 28th 2018, 4:56 pm; edited 2 times in total
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TheQuig

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 28th 2018, 4:49 pm

Once when I poured a small slab for a shed for my brother in law, he later told me he gave the driver a big tip to take the left over concrete back. I couldn't believe he did that, they always take the left over back and dump it or leave it on for the next load. That is why sometimes masons get screwed on the next load. They have a yard or two left over and on board for a few hours and it flash sets the new load they added to it. All profit for the concrete company, sell the same yard twice. A good driver will know how hot his load is and either ask to dump it in the yard or say it's safe to add to it.

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Diesel Dan

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 29th 2018, 12:24 am

This is the same plant and operator who filled our 45 yd floor order.
That was 4,000 psi, 0.45 w/c ratio and super P to make it pumpable. Floor turned out great, driver inadvertently let it slip with what I think happened. Too much water left in the drum from when he cleaned it out. That would explain why I was seeing clumps of dry cement in the pea soup. Just like dumping a packet of drink mix into a glass of water.

Had I realized it was going to take so long I probably would have started shoveling the wet stuff off to the side for fill. When ever possible I never send concrete back, I'll make forms and pour small slabs for odds and ends. In the final pic at the end of the slab there are two 2'x8'x 3.5" slabs that will be used for animal feeder bases. Two pieces of rebar keeps it together for moving.

I've seen videos of a jitterbug roller, looks good but yet another tool I'm sure not to find around here. The concrete contractors I've talked to thing spreading the gravel with a skid steer packs it. If you want a plate compactor used they have to rent one and charge extra. Similar to the excavator who things packing soil with the tracks of a dozer is good enough to build on. affraid

Once the sun came out and wind picked up I cover the slab with plastic so it won't dry too fast. Was able to knock the forms off and start leveling the other half out as well.
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TheQuig

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   October 29th 2018, 2:53 pm

Sounds good. I've have seen winds flash set concrete. The wind takes the moisture off the top and you have to work like crazy to get a decent finish on it.
I have seen loads like you describe, water left in the barrel by mistake. I learned a long time ago to put the barrel in discharge when first starting up in the morning. In the early days when we had a 300 gallon water tank that set over the cab, the valves would sometimes leak overnight. My first load ever was soup because of that. Lesson learned.

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Diesel Dan

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   November 17th 2018, 1:00 am

Going to be pouring the other half of slab tomorrow.
Still need to epoxy rebar dowels into main slab, break pavers in half for rebar chairs, round up tools to have all laid out so 6 AM wakeup, truck here at 8 and not getting home until 11:30pm will make for a short night.

Batch plant operator is personally going to test this load after the last issue.
Told them 4" slump, picked up a concrete vibrator to work the edges along both slabs for better adhesion.

Had 20 ton of crusher-run dumped for final grading of second slab and tapering the edges to drive on. The crusher-run will pack tight and hold form much better than washed 57 limestone. To date I must have had 150 ton of 57s so far on site, lots of stone!
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TheQuig

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PostSubject: Re: Moving, agin   November 17th 2018, 10:31 am

Sounds like you good to go with the crusher-run tamped down on the edges and the vibrator. It's above freezing and no wind. Good luck, you have done this enough, it will come out fine. The Prep as you know is probably half the job and makes the outcome what you expected to be.

I have trees down from the noreatern snow storm two days ago. Today I play lumberjack.
I might be coming down the day after Christmas for a week.

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